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Art History

CLASS CODE

CLASS NAME

CREDITS

AH 1000
Introduction to Art + Visual Design
3
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Introduction to Art + Visual Design

AH 1000 (3 CREDITS)

This entry-level course introduces students to the disciplines of art and design through the exploration of various academic topics within the fields. Lectures, readings and discussions investigate topics such as what defines art and how artists and designers engage within the framework of time and space. Students explore art and design through content, aesthetic values and explorations of visual critical thinking. At the end of this course students will be versed in the formal elements and principles of design, the various types of media found within the visual arts and design disciplines, the art market, and art historical categorical divisions. Additionally, students will obtain elementary knowledge of art criticism, theory and methodologies.

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AH 1100
Art History I: Ancient to Medieval
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Art History I: Ancient to Medieval

AH 1100 (3 CREDITS)

In the first of the sequence of required courses in the history of art, students explore the major artists, movements and artistic themes of the Western tradition, beginning with prehistoric art and concluding with Medieval Art. Lectures and readings examine ways in which artists conceive of religion, society, politics and the role of men and women within their historical and stylistic context. In addition, the course considers various media and materials, such as painting, sculpture and architecture, and the fundamentals of design and composition. At the conclusion of this course, students will recognize a broad range of artists, works, and styles from ancient to medieval art. Further, students will learn basic methods in discipline of art history, such as formal analysis, and write knowledgeably on topics from ancient to medieval art (Formerly AH 1010).

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AH 1200
Art History II: Renaissance to Post Impressionism
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Art History II: Renaissance to Post Impressionism

AH 1200 (3 CREDITS)

In the second of the sequence of required courses in the history of art, students explore the major artists, movements and artistic themes of Western tradition, beginning with the Renaissance and concluding with Post Impressionism. Lectures and readings examine ways in which artists conceive of religion, society, politics and the roles of men and women within their historical and stylistic context. In addition, the course considers various media and materials, such as painting, sculpture, and architecture, and the fundamentals of design and composition. At the conclusion of this course, students will recognize a broad range of artists, works, and styles from the Renaissance and concluding with Post Impressionism. Further, students will become familiar with relevant art theory and methodology, learn to conduct research within the discipline of art history, and write knowledgeably on topics from the Renaissance to Post Impressionism.

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AH 2020
History of International Animation
3
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History of International Animation

AH 2020 (3 CREDITS)

This course explores the evolution of the animation art form, its ways of expression, the power of its language, symbolism, variety of mediums, communication of ideas, political viewpoints, creation of impact, and mood. Students study the visual and design styles of both commercial and independent animation from America, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and the Far East. At the conclusion of this course, students will understand the art of animation from its early roots through the present, having studied the development of animators, studios, technologies, styles, business, and the influence of social/political change. (Formerly AN 1310)

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AH 2050
History of Graphic Design
3
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History of Graphic Design

AH 2050 (3 CREDITS)

This seminar and research course addresses important historical and contemporary developments in visual communication. Beginning with the roots of pictorial and written languages, the content moves to key 19th and 20th century periods, including the emergence of the Bauhaus and typographic history, then culminates with the contemporary scene. At the conclusion this course, students will have engaged in reading, writing and verbal critical thinking skills, both as individuals and in teams. Students will understand the embedded relationships between graphic design, culture, technology and society.

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AH 2060
History of American Illustration
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History of American Illustration

AH 2060 (3 CREDITS)

This course offers the beginning illustration student a broad view of the major personalities who influenced the illustration field. Examining how past illustrators conceived and produced their artwork for the mass media, this course uncovers the roots of style, and reveals the singular philosophies that shaped the major avenues of illustration. By the end of this course, students will exhibit increased skills and knowledge in reading, writing, and in employing analytical skills in evaluating the influences of the past in shaping visual storytelling styles within American culture.

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AH 2070
History of Architecture + Interiors
3
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History of Architecture + Interiors

AH 2070 (3 CREDITS)

This sophomore-level course provides a survey of the history of the built environment based upon architecture and interiors from antiquity through the 20th century. Students investigate and document period design within the context of the cultural, sociological, and technological issues of each era including interior and exterior architectural elements, furniture, design motifs and ornamentation. Upon successful completion of the course, students will have the ability to identify and evaluate the elements of architecture and interiors for each period studied, and apply those skills to period renovation, restoration, or to reinterpret historical design elements for current use.

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AH 2080
History of Photography
3
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History of Photography

AH 2080 (3 CREDITS)

This course explores the history of photography from its beginnings in the 1830’s to current developments in photographic practice. Lectures and readings examine major schools of photography (i.e. pictorialism, formalism, straight photography), as well as technological developments and photographic processes which expand the possibilities of the medium. Photography blurs the boundaries between art, science and document, challenges our conception of reality and raises questions about authenticity and artistic merit. The goal of this course is to develop a better understanding of the complex history of photography, its diversity of social functions, its affect on our modern vision of the world, and to address the theoretical questions inherent to this modern medium. At the conclusion of this course, students possess a deeper understanding of the history of photography. Further, students will conduct research and write knowledgeably on topics from the history of photography.

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AH 2090
History of Fashion Design
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History of Fashion Design

AH 2090 (3 CREDITS)

This course explores the evolution of wearing apparel and personal adornment throughout history to examine over 20,000 years of fashion periods reflecting politics, economics, fine art and anthropological influences. Students will investigate how History interplays with the defining styles that have emerge in clothing from the beginning of time to the contemporary interpretations of couture fashion. At the conclusion of this course, student will have a thorough understanding of how wearing apparel evolved from function to fashion as it related to the historical context and cultural influence in which it developed.

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AH 2300
Art History III: Fauvism through Modern
3
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Art History III: Fauvism through Modern

AH 2300 (3 CREDITS)

In this course, students explore the major artists, movements and artistic themes of Fauvism through the modern period. Lectures and readings examine ways in which artists conceive of religion, society, politics and the roles of men and women within their historical and stylistic context. In addition, the course considers various media and materials, the fundamentals of design and composition, and global/cultural perspectives. At the conclusion of this course, students will recognize a broad range of artists, works, and styles from Fauvism through the modern period. Further, they will become familiar with relevant art theory and methodology, learn to conduct research within the discipline of art history, and write knowledgeably on topics from Fauvism through the modern period (Formerly AH 1030).

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AH 2400
Seminar in Contemporary Art
3
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Seminar in Contemporary Art

AH 2400 (3 CREDITS)

This seminar course focuses on issues, art movements, and criticism from Postmodern to the present. Students investigate Postmodern and contemporary art through the writings of artists and critics, lectures, and readings. Further, students will become familiar with relevant art theory and methodology, learn to conduct research within the discipline of art history, and write knowledgeably on Postmodern and contemporary topics. At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to articulate Postmodern and contemporary art issues, both critically and historically, in relation to larger social and political contexts.

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AH 3010
Topics in the History of Western Art
3
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Topics in the History of Western Art

AH 3010 (3 CREDITS)

In the last of the sequence of required courses in the history of art, students concentrate on one topic in the history of modern and contemporary art and design. Advanced studies are designed to allow students to focus intensively on themes, issues, methods, and theoretical frameworks that define twentieth and twenty-first century art and design. Lectures, readings and assignments emphasize research, writing, and oral presentations. Topics vary from one term to another. Sample topics include: Abstract Expressionism, the Body in contemporary art, Art and War in the 20th century, and modern German art. At the conclusion of this course, students possess a deeper understanding of art historical movements, methods, and theories. Further, students refine and deepen their research and writing skills, researching and writing knowledgeably on topics from the course.

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AH 3500
Topics in the History of Nonwestern Art
3
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Topics in the History of Nonwestern Art

AH 3500 (3 CREDITS)

In the last of the sequence of required courses in the history of art, students concentrate on nonwestern topics and themes. Advanced studies are designed to allow students to focus intensively on themes, issues, methods, and theoretical frameworks that define nonwestern artistic traditions. Lectures, readings and assignments emphasize research, writing, and oral presentations. Topics vary from one term to another. Sample topics include: Arts of China, Arts of Japan, Religion and Art in the nonwestern world, and modern Latin American art, etc. At the conclusion of this course, students possess a deeper understanding of art historical movements, methods, and theories from the nonwestern world. Further, students refine and deepen their research and writing skills, researching and writing knowledgeably on topics from the course.

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English

CLASS CODE

CLASS NAME

CREDITS

EN 1110
Composition I
3
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Composition I

EN 1110 (3 CREDITS)

This is the first, course in the Communication + Critical Thought sequence and serves as an introduction to college-level reading, writing, discussion, and critical thinking. Students engage in a variety of academic texts, literature, and literary, aesthetic, and social criticism. By exploring a variety of writing styles, analyzing elements of form and mechanics, and engaging all aspects of the writing process, students find and demonstrate their writing voice, and write with greater authority, clarity and insight. By the end of this course students will develop their writing and critical thinking skills through critical reading, class discussion, and their own writing. (Formerly CCT 1020)

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EN 1111
Composition II
3
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Composition II

EN 1111 (3 CREDITS)

Composition II is the second part of the Communication + Critical Thought sequence. It emphasizes critical thinking, reading, and writing skills by engaging students in all aspects of the writing process. At the conclusion of the course, students have encountered a variety of academic texts, participated in critical discourses regarding the content, meaning and function of these texts, and have developed their thinking through written responses to the readings. Students also have been formally introduced to academic research, and are expected to complete a formal research paper by the end of the semester. (Formerly CCT 1030)

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EN 2310
Creative Writing
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Creative Writing

EN 2310 (3 CREDITS)

The theme of this junior-level course is that writers make choices. Undergraduates are sometimes reluctant to acknowledge a difference between creative writing and personal expression. The process of imitating necessarily begins with analysis: before students can adopt the voice of a given writer, they must have a strong understanding of how that voice is constructed. By dissecting and inhabiting diverse styles, students eventually move out of their resting voice, and they come to realize that seemingly dissimilar works share a strict attention to language. At the conclusion of the course, students demonstrate through written work and class discussion an increased ability to understand and appreciate various writing styles, and the choices writers make throughout the writing process. (Formerly SLC 3060)

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EN 3310
Topics in Literature
3
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Topics in Literature

EN 3310 (3 CREDITS)

This junior-level course explores various literary texts, movements, genres, and criticism within a cultural framework. Students learn to do textual analysis, improve their critical thinking skills, and expand their understanding of literary texts within the cultural contexts, social relations, and literary traditions and practices that produced them. Students also develop their understanding of literary criticism through reading critical texts and producing formal analysis papers in response to their reading. The course content varies, allowing students to explore specific aspects of Literature Studies with greater depth and mastery. By the end of the course students demonstrate greater understanding of literary analysis and criticism. (Formerly SLC 3040)

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Humanities

CLASS CODE

CLASS NAME

CREDITS

HU 1120
Introduction to Philosophy
3
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Introduction to Philosophy

HU 1120 (3 CREDITS)

This class offers an introduction to Western Philosophy that examines topics such as knowledge formation, the nature of existence, the foundations of morality, free will, subjectivity, and consciousness. Students explore these topics through primary readings, lectures, and class discussions. By the end of the course students increase their understanding of Philosophy as a field of study, improve their critical thinking skills, and will have engaged a variety of philosophical texts.

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HU 1130
Introduction to World Religions
3
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Introduction to World Religions

HU 1130 (3 CREDITS)

This class provides students with an introduction to the major Western religions: Judaism, Islam, and Christianity, and the major Eastern religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Confucianism. Students explore the origins, history, practices, and cultural contexts and meanings of each religious tradition. Students demonstrate a deeper understanding and appreciation for the varieties of religious thought, belief, practices, and meanings.

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HU 1140
History of American Capitalism
3
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History of American Capitalism

HU 1140 (3 CREDITS)

In this survey course students explore the economic development and history of American capitalism beginning in the 19th century. Lectures, presentations, readings, and discussions examine ways in which American capitalism grew from its small industrial beginnings to a dominant global economic force. The course considers various subtopics related to the political and social developments affecting American economic development in the 20th and 21st centuries such as the fiscal consequences of external and internal warfare, gender and race relations, the altering structures of businesses in the United States, and the role of American capitalism within the world economy in the 20th and 21st centuries. At the conclusion of this course, students will contextualize American economic development within the global political and social framework.

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HU 2210
Western Civilization I
3
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Western Civilization I

HU 2210 (3 CREDITS)

The first course in the sequence of two explores the shape and identity of western culture from classical antiquity through the 16th century. Lectures and readings examine developments in technology, economics, political structures, religious institutions and faith and social ideals. At the conclusion of this course, students will recognize the major historical achievements of western culture from classical antiquity through the 16th century. (Formerly HU 2010)

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HU 2211
Western Civilization II
3
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Western Civilization II

HU 2211 (3 CREDITS)

The second course in the sequence of two explores the shape and identity of western culture from 17th though the 19th century. Lectures and readings examine developments in technology, economics, political structures, religious institutions and faith and social ideals. At the conclusion of this course, students will recognize the major historical achievements of western culture from the 17th through the 19th century. (Formerly HU 2050)

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HU 2212
Modern + Contemporary World History
3
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Modern + Contemporary World History

HU 2212 (3 CREDITS)

Modern and Contemporary World History explores the shape and identity of western culture in the 20th and 21st centuries. Lectures and readings examine developments in technology, economics, political structures, religious institutions and faith and social ideals. At the conclusion of this course, students will recognize the major historical achievements of western culture in the 20th and 21st centuries.

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HU 2320
Ethics
3
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Ethics

HU 2320 (3 CREDITS)

This class examines ethical theories and their application towards ethical/philosophical problems. The course also examines the history and evolution of Ethics as a major branch of Western Philosophy. Students explore ethical topics through primary readings, lectures, and class discussions. By the end of the course students increase their understanding of Ethics as a branch of Western Philosophy, improve their capacity to think ethically about their lives and the world, and will have engaged a variety of philosophical texts.

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HU 3310
Topics in History
3
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Topics in History

HU 3310 (3 CREDITS)

This junior-level course explores various aspects of History as a field of study. The course content varies, allowing students to explore specific aspects of History with greater depth and mastery. By the end of the course students demonstrate greater understanding of Historical study.

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HU 3320
Topics in Philosophy
3
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Topics in Philosophy

HU 3320 (3 CREDITS)

This junior-level course explores various philosophical texts, movements, debates, and important figures. Students increase their understanding of philosophy as a field of study, improve their critical thinking skills, and improve their capacity to read and comprehend philosophical texts. The course content varies, allowing students to explore specific aspects of Philosophy with greater depth and mastery. By the end of the course students demonstrate greater understanding of Philosophy and a greater capacity to engage philosophical texts.

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HU 3342
Theatre Studies
3
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Theatre Studies

HU 3342 (3 CREDITS)

This junior-level course examines various approaches to the study of Theater. The goal of the course is to engage students in the study of Theater from a variety of perspectives. Through the study of relevant theoretical approaches, and significant aesthetic, political, and social movements students learn to analyze theater performances within larger historical and cultural contexts. By the end of the course, students have improved their capacity to think critically about performance from a variety of perspectives. (Formerly HU 4020)

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HU 3350
Film Studies
3
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Film Studies

HU 3350 (3 CREDITS)

This junior level class will explore the scope of American cinema and its impact on culture, race, gender, and technology. By studying various social, political, artistic, and philosophical perspectives, students will form a deeper understanding of how the art of film reinforces, re-imagines, and constructs our collective self-identity. During the semester students will view and dissect films from Hollywood’s silent era to more recent films produced in the 21st century. At the end of the course students will be able to discuss and dissect how the American film industry has shaped and informed our cultural identity.

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Mathematics

CLASS CODE

CLASS NAME

CREDITS

MA 1010
Animation Mathematics
3
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Animation Mathematics

MA 1010 (3 CREDITS)

This freshman-level course teaches students the math and physics skills necessary to design in a digitally created world. Relevant skills in algebra, geometry, probability and statistics are developed. Real-world phenomena such as light, mechanics, motion, collision, and magnetism are investigated from the perspective of physics. By the completion of this course, students have demonstrated through assignments, projects and exams, cognitive and analytical problem-solving methods and skills, applicable to both theoretical and natural phenomena.

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MA 1205
College Algebra
3
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College Algebra

MA 1205 (3 CREDITS)

This course provides students an integrated approach to algebraic topics through applications and visualizations. Topics include equations, and inequalities, functions and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, linear and non-linear systems, selection of topics from among graphing of the conic sections, introduction to sequences and series, permutations and combinations, the binomial theorem, and theory of equations. At the conclusion of the course, students will show their mastery of the topics discussed through assignments and exams.

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MA 1215
Applied Mathematics
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Applied Mathematics

MA 1215 (3 CREDITS)

This course introduces students to aspects of mathematics that are particularly relevant to art and design. A basic knowledge of mathematics is required (first year of high school level). Topics include: numeric and geometric patterns in art and nature (Fibonacci series, tiling), symmetry, perspective, polyhedra, equations and graphs of trajectories, computer graphics, and fractals. At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to apply mathematical equations to solve problems related to the topics listed above.

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MA 1220
Financial Principles + Practices
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Financial Principles + Practices

MA 1220 (3 CREDITS)

Students are exposed to the principles and practices of financial management in the contemporary world. Topics include basic financial concepts and tools, business plans, financial statement analysis, and working capital management investment strategies. Students set an earning goal and design a business plan and investment strategy to reach that goal.

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MA 1230
Introduction to Statistics
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Introduction to Statistics

MA 1230 (3 CREDITS)

This is an introductory course in the fundamentals of modern statistical methods. The goal of this course is to provide students with the basic knowledge and skills for working with statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, random sampling, tests of hypotheses, estimation, simple linear regression, and correlation. By the end of the course, students have increased their understanding of statistics and have improved their capacity for working with statistics.

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Physical + Natural Science

CLASS CODE

CLASS NAME

CREDITS

NS 2020
Physical Geology
3
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Physical Geology

NS 2020 (3 CREDITS)

This sophomore-level course provides an overview of Physical Geology. The course goal is to provide students with a greater understanding of geologic processes and forces. By the end of the course, students have a greater understanding of plate tectonics, rocks, minerals, volcanoes, earthquakes, natural resources, geologic time, and the processes that affect the surface and the interior of the earth.

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NS 2030
Biology
3
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Biology

NS 2030 (3 CREDITS)

In this course, students will explore the basic aspects of life on Earth. The course will cover cells, photosynthesis, DNA, genetics, evolution, natural selection, biodiversity, population dynamics, and global climate. Students will explore these topics through field trips, classroom activities, laboratory exercises, and lectures. After completing this course, students will understand the biological, chemical, and physical processes living organisms utilize to sustain life.

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NS 2040
Environmental Studies
3
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Environmental Studies

NS 2040 (3 CREDITS)

This course will examine major topics in environmental science including human population growth, conservation, species extinction, pollution, water use, energy, and climate change. Students will explore these topics through field trips, classroom activities, laboratory exercises, and lectures. At the conclusion of this course, students will not only understand current environmental issues from a scientific prospective, they will also be aware of the social and political conditions that influence environmental science.

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NS 3050
Human Ecology
3
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Human Ecology

NS 3050 (3 CREDITS)

Human Ecology examines the relationship of humans to the environment, through an analysis of historical and theoretical understandings of the relationship between environment, biology and cultures, and through a review of ecological principles and terms. Topics include: disease, sustainability, famine, and pollution at the local and global levels. At the conclusion of the course, students are able to knowledgeably discuss and write about the key theories in ecological anthropology, including the historical contexts in which they arose and environmental issues within the contexts of politics, economics, culture and the environment.

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NS 3060
Geography
3
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Geography

NS 3060 (3 CREDITS)

This sophomore-level course provides a broad overview of the discipline of Geography. The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the various components of the physical environment. Topics include the atmosphere, landforms, soils and vegetation together with their interrelationships and their relevance to human activity. Students are also introduced to maps and mapping. By the end of the course students have increased their understanding of the physical environment and how it is studied.

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Social + Behavioral Sciences

CLASS CODE

CLASS NAME

CREDITS

SBS 1110
Introduction to Anthropology
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Introduction to Anthropology

SBS 1110 (3 CREDITS)

Anthropology is the study of human beings throughout time and across space. In this course, students explore human evolution, our place in the animal kingdom, our knowledge of others, and our knowledge of ourselves through a focus on specific peoples and cultures. Students also critically evaluate the relationship between the observer and observed culture. At the end of the course students will learn about a variety of cultures, and grasp and use the principles governing the discipline of anthropology, including its methods of research and writing.

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SBS 1120
Introduction to Economics
3
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Introduction to Economics

SBS 1120 (3 CREDITS)

This course provides an introduction to macro and microeconomics. The course begins by focusing on microeconomics, the study of individual consumer and firm behavior. In the second part of the course the emphasis changes to macroeconomics, which involves the study of the economy as a whole, especially issues related to output, unemployment, productivity, inflation, and growth. By the end of the course students have a greater understanding of the economy and economics as a field of study.

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SBS 1130
Introduction to Political Science
3
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Introduction to Political Science

SBS 1130 (3 CREDITS)

Introduction to Political Science including important theories, concepts, issues, political behavior and processes, comparative politics, public administration and policy, and international relations. By the end of the course students have a greater understanding of political systems and Political Science as a field of study.

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SBS 1140
Introduction to Psychology
3
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Introduction to Psychology

SBS 1140 (3 CREDITS)

This course provides an introduction to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Topics include social, cognitive, developmental and personality psychology. By the end of the course students have a greater understanding of Psychology as a field of study.

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SBS 1150
Introduction to Sociology
3
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Introduction to Sociology

SBS 1150 (3 CREDITS)

This course provides an introduction to classical and contemporary views of modern society. Topics include the nature of community, social inequality, class, race, gender, and sexuality. Students engage with theoretical texts and case studies. By the end of the course students have a greater understanding of social forces, movements, and issues and Sociology as a field of study.

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SBS 3020
American Political Landscapes
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American Political Landscapes

SBS 3020 (3 CREDITS)

American Political Landscapes provides an overview of current political climate in the United States to encourage students to develop informed political citizenship. This course explores the history of American political thought, socio-political issues, media and politics, and civic engagement. Additional topics include the Constitution, the Electoral College, campaigning and voting. Outcomes: Through discussion, writing, and research, students gain an in-depth understanding of the history, theories, and processes of American politics.

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SBS 3310
Topics in Anthropology
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Topics in Anthropology

SBS 3310 (3 CREDITS)

This junior level course explores various aspects of Anthropology as a field of study. The course content varies, allowing students to explore specific aspects of Anthropology with greater depth and mastery. By the end of the course students demonstrate greater understanding of Anthropology and a greater capacity to engage anthropological texts.

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SBS 3340
Topics in Psychology
3
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Topics in Psychology

SBS 3340 (3 CREDITS)

This junior level course explores various aspects of Anthropology as a field of study. The course content varies, allowing students to explore specific aspects of Anthropology with greater depth and mastery. By the end of the course students demonstrate greater understanding of Anthropology and a greater capacity to engage anthropological texts.

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SBS 3350
Topics in Sociology
3
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Topics in Sociology

SBS 3350 (3 CREDITS)

This junior level course explores various aspects of Sociology as a field of study. The course content varies, allowing students to explore specific aspects of Sociology with greater depth and mastery. By the end of the course students demonstrate greater understanding of Sociology and a greater capacity to engage sociological texts.

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SBS 3360
Topics in Culture
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Topics in Culture

SBS 3360 (3 CREDITS)

Topics in Culture familiarizes students with the interdisciplinary field of Cultural Studies. Topics may include gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, youth, and family. By the end of the course students have a greater understanding of Cultural Studies, particularly regarding issues of power in social relations.

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